Alex Glow
Published

Basic Arduino + JavaScript (Workshop)

Basics to 'bots! Build your first few projects with Arduino, and work up to simple Javascript programming with NodeBots.

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Basic Arduino + JavaScript (Workshop)

Things used in this project

Hardware components

Arduino 101 & Genuino 101
Arduino 101 & Genuino 101
Any Arduino will work! Make sure you have the cable handy.
×1
LED (generic)
LED (generic)
×1
Resistor 100 ohm
Resistor 100 ohm
Pick one with a value that matches your LED. Often, LEDs will ship with matching resistors, but otherwise you can try a 100-ohm or 1k-ohm value.
×1
Pushbutton switch 12mm
SparkFun Pushbutton switch 12mm
×1
Resistor 10k ohm
Resistor 10k ohm
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Jumper wires (generic)
Jumper wires (generic)
×1
Breadboard (generic)
Breadboard (generic)
×1

Software apps and online services

Arduino IDE
Arduino IDE
Johnny-Five
Johnny-Five

Hand tools and fabrication machines

HW101 Marker
Hardware 101 HW101 Marker

Story

Read more

Schematics

1. Arduino + LED

2. Arduino + button

3. Arduino + button (using internal pullup resistor)

Code

LED example from johnny-five.io (led.js)

JavaScript
var five = require("johnny-five");
var board = new five.Board();

board.on("ready", function() {
  var led = new five.Led(13);

  // This will grant access to the led instance
  // from within the REPL that's created when
  // running this program.
  this.repl.inject({
    led: led
  });

  led.blink();
});

"Blink": Arduino example sketch

C/C++
/*
  Blink
  Turns on an LED on for one second, then off for one second, repeatedly.

  Most Arduinos have an on-board LED you can control. On the Uno and
  Leonardo, it is attached to digital pin 13. If you're unsure what
  pin the on-board LED is connected to on your Arduino model, check
  the documentation at http://www.arduino.cc

  This example code is in the public domain.

  modified 8 May 2014
  by Scott Fitzgerald
 */


// the setup function runs once when you press reset or power the board
void setup() {
  // initialize digital pin 13 as an output.
  pinMode(13, OUTPUT);
}

// the loop function runs over and over again forever
void loop() {
  digitalWrite(13, HIGH);   // turn the LED on (HIGH is the voltage level)
  delay(1000);              // wait for a second
  digitalWrite(13, LOW);    // turn the LED off by making the voltage LOW
  delay(1000);              // wait for a second
}

"Button": Arduino example sketch

C/C++
/*
  Button

 Turns on and off a light emitting diode(LED) connected to digital
 pin 13, when pressing a pushbutton attached to pin 2.


 The circuit:
 * LED attached from pin 13 to ground
 * pushbutton attached to pin 2 from +5V
 * 10K resistor attached to pin 2 from ground

 * Note: on most Arduinos there is already an LED on the board
 attached to pin 13.


 created 2005
 by DojoDave <http://www.0j0.org>
 modified 30 Aug 2011
 by Tom Igoe

 This example code is in the public domain.

 http://www.arduino.cc/en/Tutorial/Button
 */

// constants won't change. They're used here to
// set pin numbers:
const int buttonPin = 2;     // the number of the pushbutton pin
const int ledPin =  13;      // the number of the LED pin

// variables will change:
int buttonState = 0;         // variable for reading the pushbutton status

void setup() {
  // initialize the LED pin as an output:
  pinMode(ledPin, OUTPUT);
  // initialize the pushbutton pin as an input:
  pinMode(buttonPin, INPUT);
}

void loop() {
  // read the state of the pushbutton value:
  buttonState = digitalRead(buttonPin);

  // check if the pushbutton is pressed.
  // if it is, the buttonState is HIGH:
  if (buttonState == HIGH) {
    // turn LED on:
    digitalWrite(ledPin, HIGH);
  } else {
    // turn LED off:
    digitalWrite(ledPin, LOW);
  }
}

"DigitalReadSerial": Arduino example sketch

C/C++
/*
  DigitalReadSerial
 Reads a digital input on pin 2, prints the result to the serial monitor

 This example code is in the public domain.
 */

// digital pin 2 has a pushbutton attached to it. Give it a name:
int pushButton = 2;

// the setup routine runs once when you press reset:
void setup() {
  // initialize serial communication at 9600 bits per second:
  Serial.begin(9600);
  // make the pushbutton's pin an input:
  pinMode(pushButton, INPUT);
}

// the loop routine runs over and over again forever:
void loop() {
  // read the input pin:
  int buttonState = digitalRead(pushButton);
  // print out the state of the button:
  Serial.println(buttonState);
  delay(1);        // delay in between reads for stability
}

Credits

Alex Glow

Alex Glow

108 projects • 1120 followers
The Hackster team's resident Hardware Nerd. I like robots, music, EEG, wearables, and languages. FIRST Robotics kid.

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